Category Archives: Personal Development

Life lessons from a dog

 

Shady

There’s lots we can learn from a dog about living a good life.

  • Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joy-ride.
  • Get the most out of the experience of fresh air and wind in your face
  • When family members come home, always run to greet them.
  • Be obedient; when it’s in your best interest.
  • Protect your territory.
  • Take naps and stretch before rising.
  • Run and play daily.
  • Eat with enthusiasm.
  • Be loyal.
  • Never pretend to be something you’re not.
  • If you want what is buried, dig until you find it.
  • When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close and nuzzle them gently.
  • Thrive on attention and let people touch you.
  • Don’t bite when a growl will do.
  • On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree.
  • When you’re happy, dance around and wag your entire body.
  • No matter how often you’re scolded, don’t feel guilty and pout. Run right back and make friends.
  • Bond with your pack.
  • Delight in the simple joy of a long walk.
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How to Make New Year’s Resolutions Stick

Bohemian Court Chancellery

By: Dr. Donald E. Wetmore

At the beginning of each year so many of us commit to changes and worthy goals to be accomplished in the next twelve months only to be disappointed come next December 31 when we discover we are no closer to achieving thoseresolutions than we were on January 1. The noble resolutions we made early on became unstuck. So I looked at this dilemma and created four useful suggestions to increase the probability that your New Year’s resolutionswill stick this year.

1. Quantify it. Sometimes we are just too vague about what we want. Therefore, a resolution such as, “I want to lose weight this year” will probably fail. It is too vague. How much weight? Be specific. What would your ideal weight be, less what do you weigh now, is what you are going after. It is not enough to resolve that; “I want enough money in the bank this year”. Quantify. What specific amount would soothe your soul?

2. Set a deadline. Resolutions that are to be achieved “as soon as possible” wind up in the heap of “Someday I’ll”. Deadlines are commitments. Without a deadline as a self-imposed pressure point, getting started is easily postponed. You see, deadlines put us on the line and define when failure occurs. Deadlines also help us to break the resolution down into little bite-sized pieces. For example, if your goal is to lose 25 pounds by June 30, that translates into approximately 4 pounds per month, one pound per week, or a daily reduction of caloric intake (or an increase in daily caloric burn) of just 500 calories per day. Now that’s manageable. 500 calories a day is easy to achieve. 25 pounds seems like a leap across the Grand Canyon. Until we quantify our goal, set a deadline, then break it down to its daily requirements, theresolution will forever seem unattainable.

3. Change one or two things at a time. We generally do not like change in the first place. We seek the familiar and avoid the strange. The more change you put yourself through, the higher the probability your campaign will collapse. Focus in on one or two of the more important resolutions you seek to accomplish this year. When you achieve one or the other, start on the next one. Don’t overwhelm yourself with too much change all at once.

4. Be realistic. There’s just something about the start of a new year that gets us all wound up for changes in our lives, sometimes extraordinary and unrealistic changes. We become much like the child in the candy store whose eyes are bigger than his stomach. Be realistic. You can only accomplish a certain amount within a period of time. Don’t saddle yourself with unrealistic resolutions that will only spell failure later on.

Don Wetmore is a full-time professional speaker who specializes exclusively in the topic of Time Management. He conducts his nationally acclaimed Time Management Seminar throughout North America and Europe for people who want more out of life in less time, and with less stress. His seminars are witty, fast paced, and filled with practical, common sense ideas and tools. One of the country’s leading experts on this topic, he is the author of “Beat the Clock!”. To invite Don to speak at your next event, you may contact him directly at: ctsem@msn.com

 

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Forget New Year’s Resolutions

Just choose one word.

This is an interesting idea. Instead of setting a list of resolutions you hope to keep over the next twelve months, pick one word that will define the way you live during that period.

From the One Word 365 Home Page:

Forget New Year’s Resolutions. Scrap that long list of goals you won’t remember three weeks from now anyway.

Choose just one word.

One word that sums up who you want to be or how you want to live. One word that you can focus on every day, all year long.

It will take intentionality and commitment, but if you let it, your one word will shape not only your year, but also you. It will become the compass that directs your decisions and guides your steps.

Discover the big impact one word can make.

One word. 365 days. A changed life.

 

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10 Simple Communication Resolutions for 2014

Here are some things you can resolve to improve the way you communicate with others. These are simple changes, easy to keep all year.

  1. I will talk less.
  2. I will listen carefully.
  3. I will always tell the truth.
  4. I will encourage someone every day.
  5. I will treat all people with respect.
  6. I will make more positive and fewer negative comments
  7. I will match my actions to my words.
  8. I will actively cultivate my relationships.
  9. I will write more thank-you cards.
  10. I will talk to myself in a way that makes me feel better.