Free Google Tools for Your Non-Profit

Did you know that Google offers a suite of tools to qualified non-profits? These are premium, licensed Google products , but at no cost. These products can help your organization reach new donors and volunteers, work more efficiently, and tell your non-profit’s story. They are cloud-based tools, managed by Google, which may help reduce your IT costs.

Google for Nonprofits includes Google Apps for Nonprofits, Google Ad Grants, YouTube Nonprofit Program, and Google Earth Pro. Canadian registered charities, Federal nonprofits and Provincial nonprofits may be eligible to apply for the program. Please note, some types of organizations are not eligible and will not be verified:

  • Governmental entities or organizations
  • Hospitals and healthcare organizations
  • Schools, academic institutions, or universities

A quick summary of the products offered*:

G Suite for Nonprofits

Enable your teams to collaborate, iterate, and innovate together, from anywhere, in real time, with our cloud-based productivity suite.

Google Ad Grants

Receive in-kind advertising for your nonprofit through Google Search and increase awareness worldwide.

YouTube Nonprofit Program

Share your nonprofit videos through YouTube to better connect with supporters, volunteers, and donors. 

Google Earth and Maps

Bring your nonprofit’s story to life with custom maps and global location data.

One Today

Build nonprofit fundraising campaigns that tie supporters’ donations to their impact, making it easy for them to give at any level.

Steps to Access Google for Nonprofits

How does a nonprofit apply for the program? Head over to Google for Nonprofits.

  • Confirm that you meet the eligibility requirements
  • Request a Google for Nonprofits account
  • Once your nonprofit is verified, you’ll be notified by email
  • Then you can activate and use the individual products

In Canada, TechSoup manages the eligibility process, and validate your organization’s legal status and activities. If you’re looking for more detail in the process, click through to their Google for Nonprofits FAQ page.

Many small charities and non-profits don’t have the staff or budget for building the technology structure needed to create a strong digital strategy. Google for Nonprofits allows organizations of all sizes to benefit from great tools that aid with targeted advertising, donor acquisition, organizational productivity, and much more.

Check it out.

*not all products are available in all countries

7 Ways to Get More Done

  1. Work with a clean desk – A study on productivity found that, “The average desk worker has 36 hours worth of work on their desk and wastes up to 3 hours a week just ‘looking’ for STUFF!” Clean your desk to work more effectively.
  2. Keep a time log – It is a good idea to analyze your use of time. Periodically select a typical week and gather data on your daily routine. Look at the data for areas where you could improve your use of time and develop an action plan to make the improvements.
  3. Use a to-do list – Some people use a To-Do list which they complete last thing in the day or first thing in the morning. Some people combine a To-Do list with a calendar or schedule. Others prefer a “running” To-Do list which is continuously being updated. There are a number of ways to keep a To-Do list. Pick the method that works best for you.
  4. Set your priorities – When you have to choose which task on your to-do list to address next, compare the relevant importance of the tasks. For example, “Which is more important for me to do right now? Maintaining client relationships or marketing the business?”
  5. Delegate effectively – You can’t do everything yourself. Even Superman needed Jimmy Olsen. Learn to discern those things that you must do from those that can be done more effectively by someone else; both in the office and at home.
  6. Use the 80:20 Rule – The 80-20 Rule was originally postulated by the Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto. He noted that 80 percent of the reward comes from 20 percent of the effort. The trick is to isolate and identify the 20 percent. Once identified, prioritise time to concentrate your work on those items with the greatest reward.
  7. Relax – You don’t have an endless supply of energy and drive. Now and again you need to take some time to re-charge your batteries.

4 Tips to Trap Your Inner Pack Rat

A while ago, I got a new desk for my office. I figured that making room for new furniture was a good opportunity, to not only clean out my desk, but to go through everything in my office.

It seems I am more of a pack rat than I realized. I found documents going back 8+ years. The office was passed overdue for a cleaning.

Are you a pack rat; either at work or at home? Here’s some tips to help break the hoarding habit.

1) Take Inventory

Take a tour of the space you are organizing and take inventory all of your stuff. Look in cabinets, closets, bookshelves, storage containers, the garage, etc. Do you have things you haven’t used in a year or more? Ask yourself, will I use that item again? If the answer is maybe, get rid of it. Call The Salvation Army, recycle it or pass it on to someone who can use it.

2) Share your information

I save books and magazines long after I’ve read them. I find one article I’d like to reference in the future and I hang onto the whole magazine.

If you’re like that, tear out the article, recipe, instructions, etc. and file it in an organized system. I’m going one step further by scanning any such material and storing it electronically, which eliminates the paper altogether.

Recycle those that you don’t plan on reading or using again. Donate them to a local charity, a school, hospital or retirement home, where others can enjoy and learn from your books.

3) Don’t become the Pickle-Jar Guy

Do you know someone who has a garage filled with empty jars because they are going to use them someday? Empty containers make great storage, but how many do you need? If you have more than five or six empty containers stuck in a cabinet or closet collecting dust, add it to the recycling.

4) Ask the key question

‘Is my life going to change if I get rid of this thing?’ Almost always, the answer is, ‘No’. Marie Kondo has created this idea, if an object no longer “sparks joy” for us, it should be discarded. While I have a problem with the idea that our possessions should spark joy, the basic principle is a good one. Why do we hang on to things? Is it nostalgia, fear of offending family or friends, or some other reason. If you’re not using it, and it’s taking up space, get rid of it.

5) Look for the best was to rearrange the space 

After all your clutter and junk is out the door and you have a better idea of what will be left in your space, look around and rethink your layout. Maybe there’s a better way to configure the room, especially if you make good use of wall space. One good rule of thumb is, the more you use something, the closer it should be to you. Lastly, consider how you want to come off to others in the room. For example, a more open layout can give the impression of having earned more space and, therefore, power; or positioning a desk so it’s not between you and clients can seem more inviting.

6) Review weekly

You’ve got your space cleared and reorganized, it needs to be maintained. When you declutter every week, you ensure your space does not fall back to its previous state. Not only is this good for the space but it is great for your mind as well. Having a weekly declutter process will develop a sense of achievement as you maintain a clean and efficient workspace.

A simple template for a farewell speech

A number of co-workers in our office are transferring to new opportunities in new regions. We had a luncheon today to say goodbye and make some presentations. I was asked to say goodbye to one of the employees who was leaving.

Combining the fear of public speaking with the emotions of saying goodbye, can create stressful situation for people. To simplify the preparation, I have a simple template that I use to write a farewell speech.

  • Start with the obvious – use an introduction that says thank you for the privilege of representing the other members of the organization in making the presentation, and perhaps why you were chosen to make the presentation.
  • Talk about beginnings – what circumstances brought this person into the company, or what was your first contact with them?
  • Tell about the person – what are the personal characteristic that made a contribution to the organization: were they energetic, optimistic, perky, dependable, quiet, friendly, etc? Talk about the things people are going to miss when they’re gone.
  • Cover the history – what were the accomplishments or achievements during the person’s time with the company? Use stories, quips, memories to highlight what they contributed.
  • Why are they leaving? – if appropriate, touch on the circumstances that are taking them away. Look at the opportunities and challenges and wish them all the best for future success.
  • Present the gift – finish by presenting the gift that will serve as a token of thanks and remembrance.

Note: Not every one of these thoughts are going to be appropriate every time. If the employee is leaving because of corporate reorganization, you’ll probably omit the “why are they leaving” question. If the employee leaving is one of those who create more than their share of office conflict, try and frame your remarks from a personal perspective, rather than giving a false-positive picture of a warm and fuzzy workplace relationship.

Whether you’re saying a short goodbye to a volunteer coach in a youth league or making a major presentation at the retirement of a long-term employee, a farewell speech should bring conclusion and tribute for those leaving and those staying behind. A template like this will help you cover the points you need to consider when saying goodbye.

10 Tips for Effective Presentation Visuals

When considering what type of visual representation to use for your data or ideas, there are some rules of thumb to consider:

1. Use visuals sparingly. One of the biggest problems in presentations is the overuse of visuals. A useful rule of thumb is one visual for every two minutes of presentation time.

2. Use visuals pictorially. Graphs, pictures of equipment, flow charts, etc., all give the viewer an insight that would require many words or columns of numbers.

3. Present one key point per visual. Keep the focus of the visual simple and clear. Presenting more than one main idea per visual can detract from the impact.

4. Make text and numbers legible. Minimum font size for most room set-ups is 18 pt. Can you read everything? if not, make it larger. Highlight the areas of charts where you want the audience to focus.

5. Use colour carefully. Use no more than 3-4 colours per visual to avoid a rainbow effect. Colours used should contrast with each other to provide optimum visibility. For example, a dark blue background with light yellow letters or numbers. Avoid patterns in colour presentations; they are difficult to distinguish.

6. Make visuals big enough to see. Walk to the last row where people will be sitting and make sure that everything on the visual can be seen clearly.

7. Graph data. Whenever possible avoid tabular data in favour of graphs. Graphs allow the viewer to picture the information and data in a way that numbers alone can’t do.

8. Make pictures and diagrams easy to see. Too often pictures and diagrams are difficult to see from a distance. The best way to check is to view it from the back of the room where the audience will be. Be careful that labels inside the diagrams are legible from the back row also.

9. Make visuals attractive. If using colour, use high contrast such as yellow on black or yellow on dark blue. Avoid clutter and work for simplicity and clarity.

10. Avoid miscellaneous visuals, If something can be stated simply and verbally, such as the title of a presentation, there is no need for a visual.

7 Energy-Saving Ideas for Summer

Non-profit organizations face the same challenges and costs, when it comes to operating their facilities. Rent, taxes, insurance, utilities are all part of the cost of doing business.

Some of these costs are out of the control of the organization. For example, taxes are set by the municipality, and not many of them have exemptions for non-profits. On the other hand, utility costs can be managed.

Here are seven tips to help you manage your energy costs in the summer.

  1. Consider installing an automated thermostat that turns off your air conditioner at night.
  2. Open windows in the summer. It costs nothing, but it saves energy and money. Keep your windows open in the evening and overnight to allow cooler air into your home, and turn off your air conditioner. Close the windows during the day to keep the cool air in and the warm air out.
  3. Ceiling fans use less electricity than air conditioners or furnaces. For example, a ceiling fan costs about five cents an hour to operate, which is much less than an air conditioner.
  4. Did you know that you use three to five percent more energy for each degree that your air conditioner is set below 24 degrees Celsius or 75 degrees Fahrenheit? So, set your thermostat to 25 degrees Celsius or 77 degrees Fahrenheit to provide the most comfort at the least cost.
  5. Use awnings and overhangs to keep the sun out of south-facing windows in the summers. Take them down the awnings to let the sun shine in during the winter.
  6. Installing high efficiency windows with low-e coatings, argon gas fill and insulated spacers have made a difference to the amount of heat in the house.
  7. A reflective roof can reduce the roof surface temperature by up to 60 degrees Fahrenheit, depending on your climate. A reflective roof prevents the sun’s heat from transferring into the building.

Learn more, do more, become more